Chelsea Scott

I'm a printmaker with a BFA from Middle Tennessee State University, currently living in Brooklyn, NY.

I was taught from a young age to pay attention and not to interrupt. Not because my parents felt children should remain silent in the background, but because being interested and engaged in what other people have to say is an important, acquired quality. This is something that I still often strive to practice. While I listen to others speak, I watch the way their mouths form audible thoughts. I see their eyes dart from one corner of the room to the other, or remain connected and focused with my own. I notice the tension in their temples as their skin wrinkles and contracts during the pauses of speech, searching for the right words to express their reasoning. These countless movements taking place at one time are what I consider when making these prints. Working from one or two images, I try to capture the combined qualities that define the subject's character.
The process that is best suited to this style is a reductive screen printing method. By working this way, it allows me to slow down and fully examine the traits of the person I am trying to capture. I work in a monochromatic scale for a related reason. The black and white tones allow the viewer to focus on the lights and darks, rather than the hue and saturation of color.I've always admired Chuck Close's piece of Philip Glass because it freezes a moment on his face that is a familiar look to those around him. It is this recognizable expression that I am seeking to achieve with each print I create, regardless of the fact that the subject is a stranger.
The sense of security received from spending time with one's closest friends is a feeling I want to pull from those viewing my work.

I'm a printmaker with a BFA from Middle Tennessee State University, currently living in Brooklyn, NY.

I was taught from a young age to pay attention and not to interrupt. Not because my parents felt children should remain silent in the background, but because being interested and engaged in what other people have to say is an important, acquired quality. This is something that I still often strive to practice. While I listen to others speak, I watch the way their mouths form audible thoughts. I see their eyes dart from one corner of the room to the other, or remain connected and focused with my own. I notice the tension in their temples as their skin wrinkles and contracts during the pauses of speech, searching for the right words to express their reasoning. These countless movements taking place at one time are what I consider when making these prints. Working from one or two images, I try to capture the combined qualities that define the subject's character.
The process that is best suited to this style is a reductive screen printing method. By working this way, it allows me to slow down and fully examine the traits of the person I am trying to capture. I work in a monochromatic scale for a related reason. The black and white tones allow the viewer to focus on the lights and darks, rather than the hue and saturation of color.I've always admired Chuck Close's piece of Philip Glass because it freezes a moment on his face that is a familiar look to those around him. It is this recognizable expression that I am seeking to achieve with each print I create, regardless of the fact that the subject is a stranger.
The sense of security received from spending time with one's closest friends is a feeling I want to pull from those viewing my work.

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